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Macular Degeneration Glossary Term

Loss of central vision due to damage to the macular. Most common in older people (AMD) but can occur in younger people.
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Macular hole Glossary Term

A small hole in the macular - different from macular degeration. Causes problems such as straight lines appearing wavy.
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Marfan syndrome Glossary Term

A disorder of the connective tissue which can affect the eyes.
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Microphthalmia Glossary Term

Microphthalmia literally means small eye. Children may be born with one or both eyes, small and underdeveloped. Some children may be blind, but others may have some residual sight or light perception.
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Monocular vision Glossary Term

Blinding or removal of one eye due to accident, injury or disease.
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Myopia (high degree) Glossary Term

A chronic, degenerative condition which can create problems because of its association with degenerative changes at the back of the eye.
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Medical Glossary Term

Of or pertaining to the practice of medicine. The medical model of Disability focuses on impairments rather than social and attitudinal barriers cf. Social Model of Disability.
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Modifier Glossary Term

A modifier is a key that can be used in conjunction with a second key and modifies its behaviour. Assistive technology may have its own modifier key so that its keystrokes do not conflict with the keystrokes used by the operating system (e.g. Windows) or other programs.
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MP3 Glossary Term

MP3 is a common music file format. It stands for for "Moving Picture Experts Group Phase 1, Audio Layer 3".
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Multi-Sensory Impairment (MSI) Glossary Term

Pupils with MSI have a combination of visual and hearing difficulties. They are sometimes referred to as deafblind but may have some residual sight and/or hearing. Many also have additional disabilities but their complex needs mean it may be difficult to ascertain their intellectual abilities. Pupils with MSI have much greater difficulty accessing the curriculum and the environment than those with a single sensory impairment. They have difficulties in perception, communication and in the acquisition of information. Incidental learning is limited. The combination can result in high anxiety and multi-sensory deprivation. Pupils need teaching approaches that make good use of their residual hearing and vision, together with their other senses. They may need alternative means of communication.
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